Kuksa pictures

For all those other associated crafts.

Moderators: jrccaim, Bob_Fleet, gavin, Robin Fawcett, HughSpencer

Re: Kuksa pictures

Postby Graeme Fraser » Mon Mar 07, 2011 2:56 pm

The first birch Kuksa I made has seen regular use and was steeped overnight in hot, pure food-grade linseed oil. Unfortunately it is still greasy to the touch nearly 4 months after being finished and is left with white streaks on it after use. The white streaks disappear after a while at room temperature but reappear in the cold as you can see from the picture. Many other pieces I finished in this way have not yet been used and still feel greasy to the touch. Perhaps the linseed oil I used was not as good or as pure as that which others use or I may, indeed, be doing something wrong. I've gone over to using Tung oil rubbed in with my fingers after a recommendation from a contact. He advises to rub in two coats with the fingers, leaving 24 - 48 hours between coats and wiping any excess off thirty minutes after oiling. He said to wait a fortnight and repeat then wait a further month or so and all should be well. Sufficient time has not yet elapsed for me to confirm it or not but the Tung does seem to dry considerably quicker. I lost a one pint noggin type cup by overheating it in the linseed oil (essentially deep frying it). I totally forgot it was in the cauldron of oil and now It has splits along the grain at the front and rear of the bowl yet is not in the slightest greasy. Perhaps a balance exists somewhere in the middle but that noggin was a lot of work, having been carved from very hard part seasoned Norway Maple and its loss upset me immensely.

A water tight shrink pot sounds a wonderful and most impressive achievement: I'd love to see pictures. I made my very first shrink pot yesterday and it's a bit on the crude side to say the least. Still, if it does work and doesn't split, I'll be able to keep the bigger spoons I've carved in it but there's no way it'd be suitable for loose dry goods unless caulked never mind liquids. Sean Hellman's recently displayed shrink pot is such a beautiful creation in comparison. Still, I'm keen to make more and hopefully get better, same with with the Kuksat, Voyageur cups, bowls and spoons.

All the best,
Graeme :D
Graeme Fraser
Regular
 
Posts: 108
Joined: Mon Oct 12, 2009 5:47 pm

Re: Kuksa pictures

Postby Stanleythecat » Tue Mar 08, 2011 2:07 pm

Thanks for your reply Graeme

The shrink pot is pretty tight. Sycamore with a birch disc in the bottom. I know it will leak slightly because when I hold it up to strong light and look into it I can see a little glimmer on one edge. On the last one I made for this purpose I dripped some bee's wax around the underneath of the joint as an experiment. Unintentionally this worked better than expected because when the hot liquid was applied the wax was drawn up in to the joint and sealed the pot perfectly. I have been using it for over a year now without a drip, split or crack! (it did need some oil to seal the wood though)

I have some tung oil so I will give it a try.

Thanks again

Leo
Stanleythecat
Regular
 
Posts: 166
Joined: Mon Mar 23, 2009 4:04 pm
Location: South Glos/ Wiltshire

Re: Kuksa pictures

Postby RichardLaw » Tue Mar 08, 2011 10:17 pm

robin wood wrote:May be for milking, perhaps sheep?

I have a very similar one from Romania, it sits over a bucket as you milk into it, then you can glance at the milk and check it has no nasties before tipping it into the bucket. Mine is about 6" diameter at the bowl.


Yeah, I think the Samis made some stunning vessels for milking reindeer. However, I think that extra handle would be just asking for you to get kicked when you dug it in the sheep's leg, and how do you hold a two handled jug and milk at the same time? When I wor a lad just milking was a two handed job, never mind holding the bucket (it did get kicked over now and again!)
User avatar
RichardLaw
Regular
 
Posts: 570
Joined: Tue May 13, 2008 10:17 am
Location: Skipton North Yorkshire

Re: Kuksa pictures

Postby robin wood » Wed Mar 09, 2011 12:33 am

RichardLaw wrote:
robin wood wrote:May be for milking, perhaps sheep?

I have a very similar one from Romania, it sits over a bucket as you milk into it, then you can glance at the milk and check it has no nasties before tipping it into the bucket. Mine is about 6" diameter at the bowl.


Yeah, I think the Samis made some stunning vessels for milking reindeer. However, I think that extra handle would be just asking for you to get kicked when you dug it in the sheep's leg, and how do you hold a two handled jug and milk at the same time? When I wor a lad just milking was a two handed job, never mind holding the bucket (it did get kicked over now and again!)


The sami reindeer milking vessels are stunning like huge kuksas with a long handle, very inturned rim to stop splashes escaping and carved from birch burr.
The Romanian milking vessel is for sheep. They bring the sheep in onto a stand to save the back, a bucket goes in front of the back legs just as if milking a goat, the bowl sits across the bucket with the lugs resting on the sides. after milking the sheep the milk is checked before being tipped up into the bucket with the rest.
http://www.robin-wood.co.uk bowls, books and courses
User avatar
robin wood
Regular
 
Posts: 1670
Joined: Thu Mar 30, 2006 10:21 am
Location: derbyshire

Re: Kuksa pictures

Postby RichardLaw » Wed Mar 09, 2011 9:29 am

robin wood wrote: the bowl sits across the bucket with the lugs resting on the sides. after milking the sheep the milk is checked before being tipped up into the bucket with the rest.

Aha! Cunning!
User avatar
RichardLaw
Regular
 
Posts: 570
Joined: Tue May 13, 2008 10:17 am
Location: Skipton North Yorkshire

Re: Kuksa pictures

Postby Simon Hill » Thu Mar 10, 2011 9:51 pm

A Alder Kuksa made for my nephew.

Image
User avatar
Simon Hill
Regular
 
Posts: 45
Joined: Tue Mar 16, 2010 6:43 pm
Location: Cheshire

Re: Kuksa pictures

Postby woodchubber » Sun Mar 13, 2011 10:48 pm

These are the only kuksas I still have in my possession. I don't make many as they are very time consuming and hard on the hands. Hawthorn, Field Maple and Sycamore.
Image
Image
Cheers- John
woodchubber
Regular
 
Posts: 101
Joined: Sat Nov 15, 2008 9:38 am

Re: Kuksa pictures

Postby Rich Dyson » Mon Mar 14, 2011 7:56 pm

Here are a couple of mine

Image
Birch Burr

Image
Cherry
Rich Dyson
Regular
 
Posts: 58
Joined: Mon Feb 23, 2009 11:49 pm
Location: Halifax West Yorkshire

Re: Kuksa pictures

Postby Mikkel Frederiksen » Wed Jun 22, 2011 8:04 pm

Here Is a new kuksa, that i just finished.
I really like working with this onion-shape. Though I need to work a bit on getteing it a bit more symmetrical :?

The chip-carving is also a nice challenge :)

Image

Image
User avatar
Mikkel Frederiksen
Regular
 
Posts: 93
Joined: Wed Jan 14, 2009 7:22 pm
Location: Odder, Denmark

Re: Kuksa pictures

Postby Sharif Adams » Thu Jun 23, 2011 7:27 am

Very nice Kuksa; the crisp, wide bevels around the front up to the point and around the handle are lovely to look at.
Sharif Adams
Regular
 
Posts: 39
Joined: Mon Jan 03, 2011 9:46 pm
Location: Hertfordshire

Re: Kuksa pictures

Postby REM Thomas » Wed Jul 27, 2011 4:37 pm

Seem to recall a German Outdoor and Camping firm sold them. Hand made in Scandanavia. Waterproofing; beeswax. I know people who use liquid paraffin wax but, though preganant women drank it in the past...you never know! Bob the Bodger
REM Thomas
Regular
 
Posts: 21
Joined: Sun Apr 03, 2005 3:40 pm
Location: Leicestershire

Re: Kuksa pictures

Postby Mikkel Frederiksen » Sat Aug 27, 2011 6:20 am

Here us my latest kuksa :)

Image

Image

Image
User avatar
Mikkel Frederiksen
Regular
 
Posts: 93
Joined: Wed Jan 14, 2009 7:22 pm
Location: Odder, Denmark

Re: Kuksa pictures

Postby RichardLaw » Sat Aug 27, 2011 8:56 am

That organic pattern underneath is brilliant!
User avatar
RichardLaw
Regular
 
Posts: 570
Joined: Tue May 13, 2008 10:17 am
Location: Skipton North Yorkshire

Re: Kuksa pictures

Postby Mikkel Frederiksen » Sun Aug 28, 2011 8:03 pm

Thanks Richard. I got the inspiration for the pattern from at spoon by Fritiof Runhal, that Robin posted a picture of, a couple of years ago (This one:http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-fsFb-Snqlpk/Ta3Qf0vj6TI/AAAAAAAAC2Q/4u01ywoiv5g/s1600/IMG_0096.jpg)

I had been thinking about that pattern for very long, so I felt that it was time to try it out.
Its not that hard to do. I just used the tip of mu frost 106 to make it.
User avatar
Mikkel Frederiksen
Regular
 
Posts: 93
Joined: Wed Jan 14, 2009 7:22 pm
Location: Odder, Denmark

Re: Kuksa pictures

Postby Baggy » Sat Oct 08, 2011 10:48 am

My latest Cherry kuksa...

Image
Image

For th photographically minded, My Canon1Ds died during this shoot :cry:
Best wishes
Mark
----------------------------
I can spell but I cannot type.

Photos of the Chelmer and Blackwater canal
http://markbaigent.zenfolio.com/chelmer_blackwater
Baggy
Regular
 
Posts: 306
Joined: Fri Oct 30, 2009 11:03 pm
Location: Danbury, Essex.

PreviousNext

Return to Greenwood crafts

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 3 guests