Spoon detailing

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Spoon detailing

Postby goldsmithexile2013 » Fri Nov 22, 2013 6:18 pm

Can I ask my fellow spoon carvers a few questions please?

!/ How do you do the rim of the spoon bowl? I tend to chamfer it at roughly a 45 degree angle, sort of like on those sycamore dairy bowls. Is there better ways to get a resilient edge?
2/ Is it impportant to make spoons to have a specific and consistent volume
3/ How important is symmetry? Originally I considered it essential, but now I am much more inclined to allow the foible's of each individual piece of wood have its own personality and say. Sometimes a kind of "asymmetric symetry" results and I have started to quite like it, (although I dont favour totally weird free form sort of spoons, cant stretch that far!)

Any thoughts would be most interesting. Cheers Jonathan :D
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Re: Spoon detailing

Postby woodness sake » Fri Nov 22, 2013 7:04 pm

Speaking from a strictly retail point of view:
1. I intend for my spoons to be used for day to day food service so the bowls are about 1/8" thick and I roll the edge from the inside so as to maintain strength and allow a cutting edge. The surfaces are all burnished which "dulls" the edge just a bit.
2. If the intention of the spoon is measurement, then yes, and mark that measurement on the handle somewhere.
3. Most of my spoons are made from a symmetrical pattern. Some are free form and with the natural edge apparent but have straight handles. If the purpose of the spoon is not apparent in the design, unless you intend some sort of artsy thing, why would anyone want it? The exception would be if the wood grain is unusually attractive in and of itself.
In the end, you probably will come across someone who will buy anything you feel like making.
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Re: Spoon detailing

Postby gavin » Tue Nov 26, 2013 9:06 pm

goldsmithexile2013 wrote:2/ Is it impportant to make spoons to have a specific and consistent volume
3/ How important is symmetry?

2/No - you are not making items for Trading Standards to use and test!
2/ Not at all. Easier if not symmetrical.

I also suggest you look at the Greenwood/ spoon carver page on Facebook where you'll no doubt gain many more opinions.
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Re: Spoon detailing

Postby Bob_Fleet » Tue Nov 26, 2013 10:22 pm

Symmetry etc is a matter of personal taste. If you can make what you like and sell it then the world and you will be much happier.
Also if you try for similar spoons it's a lot easier to succeed than identical.
Make lots then choose any matching ones if you want sets or pairs.
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Re: Spoon detailing

Postby goldsmithexile2013 » Wed Nov 27, 2013 6:38 pm

Thank you for replying to my questions. :)
Since I posted, I have been working with a huge stack of cherry and beech crooks, axeing like theres no tommorrow, working intuitively. When I first strated carving spoons (a few years ago), if the crook bend was off or wonky, I would think no, not good enough and reject them-consequently I would end up with only maybe 1 in 10 crooks being usable! But with these latest ones I thought ok, within reason use the unevenness rather than impose symmetry on it. I quite like how I can end up with 2 versions of the same form, one either side so to speak..Its like on some of the old irish and welsh chairs where sometimes they arent quite perfectly symmetrical, and it adds a certain rugged charm to the piece.
cheers Jonathan
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Re: Spoon detailing

Postby Robin Fawcett » Thu Nov 28, 2013 9:13 am

Any pics of those crooks and spoons Jonathan?
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Re: Spoon detailing

Postby goldsmithexile2013 » Thu Nov 28, 2013 12:14 pm

Here is an example
Image

Image

Image
Some of what I did yesterday afternoon, some beech, some copper beech
Image
Heres a fun carving video
http://youtu.be/ffZWt4yV7DE
cheers Jonathan :)
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Re: Spoon detailing

Postby Robin Fawcett » Fri Nov 29, 2013 10:00 am

Great stuff - I like the vid... Is that a Roselli ?
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Re: Spoon detailing

Postby goldsmithexile2013 » Fri Nov 29, 2013 8:55 pm

Thanks for taking the time to look :)
Indeed it is a roselli all round axe, although I removed its rather strange upswept handle and made a new one. It packs a real fierce punch and bites deep when its needed but can do very fine little slices too. Dead easy to keep sharp, file/small norton stone. I am fond of those Finnish axes "kirves". They tend to have very narrow cutting edges, maybe because there arent big oaks and elms to fell in the far North. They are like power chisels! I once saw a great little video of 2 Finnish men riving a birch from one end to the other. They just directed alternate blows first one man then the other, as they worked along the trunk. Every blow was measured and spot on accurate
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