pot hook

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pot hook

Postby Nicola Wood » Mon Jun 23, 2008 10:39 am

Just back from a bushcrafty weekend with a load of people from the 'British Blades' forum. One of the folk there had made this pot hook and they were using it for hooking lids off pots on the fire. He first saw a picture of one in a Ray Mears book and couldn't figure out how it works so had to make one to find out...
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The one little wedge holds it all together quite firmly and it then easily comes apart if you want to pack it down - very cool 8)
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confused!

Postby Andy Coates » Mon Jun 23, 2008 4:31 pm

Very nifty...but I can't fathom how it actualy holds together...

and isn't it a rather over-worked solution to a problem that doesn't exist? Surely such a hook can be fashioned in a few minutes and would be disposable rather than something you had to dismantle and pack away? And how big is it to require the break-down version?
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Postby Nicola Wood » Mon Jun 23, 2008 7:09 pm

I don't think I could explain how it works easily either - I had to take it apart and put it back together a few times to get my head around it! It's like one of those wooden puzzles the kids have. It's why Spam had to make one to work it out.

As to it's use ... the idea is you could suspend a pot or kettle from a tripod over a fire with it. I think you'd struggle to find a tree with one branch pointing upwards and the next pointing downwards to do that. You could joint two bits into a longer piece, but they'd not have the same natural strength.

The bushcraft folk like the idea that they could backpack to somewhere remote, make themselves a shelter, light a fire, snare a rabbit and make a stew. OK they don't actually do it that much, but they like to think they could do it! Packing it down therefore has an appeal in that it would be less likely to get snapped rammed in a pack with the rest of their junk.

That said, it's a bit of fun mostly :roll:
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got it!

Postby Andy Coates » Mon Jun 23, 2008 8:25 pm

Thanks for that, Nicola. You wouldn't need a branch with opposing twigs though...you could carve the nick for the billycan handle. But I take the point...

but...I've figured it out! The wedge bisects both pieces, which itself acts as a binder, and then also it forces the lower and upper angled portions into their respective keyway and effectively locks the thing together. Very clever stuff.

I've been thinking about this whilst walking on the beach this evening! How sad is that?
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Postby Nicola Wood » Mon Jun 23, 2008 8:29 pm

:lol: Your description sounds good - I did most of my thinking for my phd whilst out walking the hills with my dog!
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Postby goldsmithexile » Thu Jun 26, 2008 4:21 pm

Its a tiny tiny version of an old established anglo saxon scarf joint used in framing to join 2 or more short lengths of oak to make (usually) sole plates or wall plates that need to run the ful length of the building. They devised this because of the difficulty of finding 40 or 50 foot beams. When its correctly set out and cut and assebmled it can have something aproaching 65% efficiency (65% of the strength of a similar dimensioned solid beam) What would improve it would be use 2 tiny folding wedges instead of a single one, they oppose each other and push the 2 parts longitudinally away from each other and forcing them into there oposing housings
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