semi-greenwood craft!

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semi-greenwood craft!

Postby Andy Coates » Mon Jun 23, 2008 4:54 pm

Inspired by you all I've been trying to combine some Greenwood techniques with my electric lathe.

So I made a maul first.

First real attempt...(although I already turn lots and lots of greenwood items) was to use an axe to produce a blank for the lathe. This as an alternative to using the chainsaw or bandsaw.

The log I chose was a difficult one...a large Yew log...

Image

And it worked surprisingly well.

I loved the cleft face so much that I decided to retain it in the bowl and simply scorch it for definition...

Image

And then it seemed to need the "foot" removing to be in keeping with the organic feel to the upper half...so off with the foot to leave a hemishperical bowl with cleft edge...

Image

Prompted by this, today a made an axe block (correct term?) from a chainsawed round (blank) of maple that had been drying for three or four years, but was not worth turning. So I cut three lengths of thin Yew and fitted them as splayed legs. And it works very well. I'll take a picture tomorrow.

The best thing was that a customer spotted me trying it out...roughing a spoon blank with a axe...and wanted to know how much they were!

So thanks to all of you for the inspiration to work differently. If I only save on bandsaw blades alone it'll be worth it!
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semi-greenwood craft

Postby Steve Martin » Tue Jun 24, 2008 3:19 am

I really like the bowl. Taking off the foot seems to have been the right thing to do. The maul is good, too. Nice size, especially for use with chisels but my guess is you're going to need a bigger one with a longer handle, especially if you have a froe. I've got one made of a root ball that has lasted for several years and another one that I made from a piece where several branches grew out of the trunk. This gave me the benefit of end grain (tougher) with a built in handle.

I have had similar experiences making small benches for chopping blocks, then being asked to sell them for other uses because they seem to be the right size for many things. The most enjoyable for me was a man who said his wife forbade him to put his feet on the new porch rail while he rocked and drank his morning coffee. But she wouldn't mind if he rested his feet on a scruffy old bench. :D
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Postby Paul Booker » Tue Jun 24, 2008 12:13 pm

Andy that is a great bowl and and lovely looking maul, its a shame to use it. I am not very appreciative of art, but that does it for me.

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maul and art

Postby Andy Coates » Tue Jun 24, 2008 6:14 pm

Thank you for the kind comments. I hadn't expected the maul to be appreciated! It's a five minute job with a large piece of Yew and a sharp roughing gouge...Oh, and a skew for the V cuts and an old steel guitar string for the burns...

But it's not art!

It's woodturning...

But the thought was nice of you.
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