home made paint tutorial

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Re: home made paint tutorial

Postby Bob_Fleet » Thu Mar 05, 2009 11:29 pm

Hi David
The indigo is used as a dye. It has a horrible production method which sounds like anaerobic fermentation with resulting smells. (Good job you didn't ask about purple - the shellfish smell is worse) The resulting yellow solution is used to dye the material which turns blue in the process. Don't know how it would be used on wood or in a paint though.
Wode grows VERY easily and as Simon said it is a thug of a weed. Some American states have banned it.

I don't know where to get Indigo seeds or what the growth conditions are.
Sounds like another goose trail to follow.
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Re: home made paint tutorial

Postby Mikael M » Sat Mar 07, 2009 2:01 pm

I checked what the 1835 book by George Field Chromatography, Or, A Treatise on Colours and Pigments, and of Their Powers in Painting, &c says about indigo:

"1 INDIGO or Indian Blue is a pigment manufactured in the East and West Indies from several plants but principally from the anil or indigo fera It is of various qualities and has been long known and of great use in dyeing In painting it is not so bright as Prussian blue but is extremely powerful and transparent hence it may be substituted for some of the uses of Prussian blue It is of great body and glazes and works well both in water and oil Its relative permanence as a dye has obtained it a false character of extreme durability in painting a quality in which it is nevertheless very inferior even to Prussian blue It is injured by impure air and in glazing some specimens are firmer than others but not durable in tint with white lead they are all fugitive when iised however in considerable body in shadow it is more permanent but in all respects inferior to Prussian blue.

2 INTENSE BLUE is indigo refused by solution and precipitation in which state it is equal in colour to Antwerp blue By this process indigo also becomes more durable and much more powerful transparent and deep It washes and works admirably in water in other respects it has the common properties of indigo We have been assured by an eminent architect equally able and experienced in the use of colours that these blues of indigo have the property of pushing or detaching Indian ink from paper The same is supposed to belong to other blues but as this effect is chemical it can hardly be an attribute of mere colour."

There is lots of information on pigents and painting in the book, also blue pigments. And the best thing, it's available free online:
http://books.google.com/books?id=NBMFAAAAYAAJ&hl=fi

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Re: home made paint tutorial

Postby DavidFisher » Sat Mar 07, 2009 2:25 pm

Thanks all for taking the time to provide that information and the link. Fascinating stuff, and another one of those situations where the more I learn the more I realize there is to learn! I'll be looking for rocks on my walks and doing some experimenting with some earth tones. The blues may take a bit more work, but until then I could pick up some prepared blue pigments.
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Re: home made paint tutorial

Postby jacob » Thu Aug 27, 2009 2:26 pm

What is the function of the egg in the recipe?
We've been talking about Holkham Hall paints recently: http://www.woodworkuk.co.uk/forum/viewt ... f=7&t=1968
I'm wondering about mixing my own instead.
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Re: home made paint tutorial

Postby robin wood » Thu Aug 27, 2009 3:38 pm

jacob wrote:What is the function of the egg in the recipe?
We've been talking about Holkham Hall paints recently: http://www.woodworkuk.co.uk/forum/viewt ... f=7&t=1968
I'm wondering about mixing my own instead.


Ever tried mixing oil and water without an emulsifier?
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Re: home made paint tutorial

Postby jacob » Thu Aug 27, 2009 3:59 pm

Right. Had to look it up: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Emulsion
I didn't know that mustard was an emulsifier in a vinaigrette.
Something new everyday! :lol:
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Re: home made paint tutorial

Postby jrccaim » Sun Oct 11, 2009 2:59 am

The function of the emulsifier is to break the surface tension of the substances being combined. In a vinaigrette, mustard is the ingredient of choice but plain old salt would probably work as well. In mayonnaise, for instance, salt is the surface tension breaker. When surface tension is broken, the droplets can be broken up. Voila. emulsion.
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Re: home made paint tutorial

Postby ToneWood » Tue Apr 24, 2012 2:35 pm

Excellent article - just what I was looking for. Thanks again Robin :)

In the USA, Daniel Smith, Seattle, WA sell pigments - and all manner of paints, dyes, pastels, etc. made with them. Good company, good products - good combination of quality/value compared to fancier, more famous brands. (You can get them in the UK now too but the prices aren't so keen here.) However I like the idea of finding your own natural earth colours (umbers, ochres, siennas) - esp. as some pigments are hazardous (e.g. the cadmiums reds & oranges). There are some interesting bright red soils down in Devon which come to mind. How about chalk white?

Listening to BBC Radio 4 last week, a woman (an architect I think) was talking about some cardboard house they (or somebody else) had made. One tit-bit(/tid-bit) mentioned, when talking about how they waterproof the cardboard, was that a guy has applied for a patent on a treatment with involves baking egg-white in an oven - apparently his process yields something with features not unlike Goretex (e.g. waterpoof & breathable).
Last edited by ToneWood on Mon Apr 30, 2012 12:19 pm, edited 3 times in total.
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Re: home made paint tutorial

Postby ToneWood » Sun Apr 29, 2012 8:35 pm

Bob_Fleet wrote:...The best rocks for blue pigment come from a series of mines in a valley called Sar-e sang, the place of the stone.
They were used by all the old masters but were quite expensive.
Unfortunately the valley is in Afghanistan and the rock you want is Lapis Lazuli -Ultramarine - from beyond the seas.
£2,500 a pound.
...
Daniel Smith were selling a few premium pigments a while back, including Lapis Lazuli.

RE. natural earth pigments such as umbers, ochres, etc. - of course coming from the earth doesn't necessarily mean they aren't toxic.
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Milk Paint

Postby ToneWood » Sun Aug 05, 2012 9:30 am

Anybody come across Milk Paint? http://milkpaint.com
Used to paint wooden furniture & walls apparently. Came across it here: http://www.antickfurnishings.com/
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http://milkpaint.com/Merchant2/merchant ... ry_Code=SP
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Re: Milk Paint

Postby gavin » Sun Aug 05, 2012 9:45 pm

ToneWood wrote:Anybody come across Milk Paint? http://milkpaint.com
Used to paint wooden furniture & walls apparently. Came across it here: http://www.antickfurnishings.com/
Image
http://milkpaint.com/Merchant2/merchant ... ry_Code=SP

Yep, works a treat - I just started using it on wood.
What suggestions for dye-stuff or tinting or colouring suppliers?
We bought some dye or tint in Sweden in 2006 and I will run out one day. Who supplies the stuff in UK?
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Re: Milk Paint

Postby ToneWood » Tue Sep 11, 2012 9:06 pm

gavin wrote:...What suggestions for dye-stuff or tinting or colouring suppliers?
We bought some dye or tint in Sweden in 2006 and I will run out one day. Who supplies the stuff in UK?

Came across this UK company, J. Penny Ltd. They appear to be reasonably priced & wood-oriented: http://www.jpennyltd.co.uk/shopping/sta ... e=1&cat=10
Here's a good one in the USA, Earth Pigments: http://www.earthpigments.com/how-to-use-pigments.cfm

Amazon offer various pigments, such as has these, rather expensive though:
Image
Volvox Mineral Earth Pigments - (Ultramarine Blue)
Natural Wall Paint & Plaster
Product Description
The Holzweg coloured pigments in powder form are natural, insoluble pigments (earth and mineral pigments) in natural colors.


Winsor & Newton Dry Artists' pigments:
In the UK: http://www.artmail.co.uk/wnadgp.shtml
In the USA: http://www.citystationerygroup.com/inde ... gory_id=59

Daniel Smith Dry Artists' pigments, USA: http://www.danielsmith.com/ItemSearch-- ... t--srcin-1

Warning: Google apparently equates "natural" to "organic", organic pigments are often far from natural.
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Re: home made paint tutorial

Postby ToneWood » Wed May 07, 2014 6:43 pm

The EU are currently considering whether to ban cadmium in artists' pigments and paints. Jackson's art supplies sent out this campaign notice today: http://us3.campaign-archive1.com/?u=63a ... f161c1b10a
I'm all for reducing toxins in the environment (cadmium is carcinogenic - it can cause cancer), especially in our food-web, but the cadmium colours are particularly rich, strong and vibrant in my experience. Safer, better modern pigments are available for some/many colours now but I not aware of any that match the quality of cadmium pigments, yet. Cheaper paint sets (e.g. student grade) do not contain cadmium pigments (instead they may contain synthetic "hues") but they often feature in better "artists grade" sets - but usually in limited amounts (expensive).

Anyway, I bring it to your attention. You can balance the issues and draw your own conclusions.
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