cordless drill batteries

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Re: Series 1 Landrovers

Postby Oddball » Sun Feb 27, 2011 2:15 pm

Billman wrote:I believe early (WW2) American Jeeps and British Austin Champs may have been 6 volt, but I guess somone will put us right if I am wrong....


Yes, early jeeps & even trucks were 6 volt. Late in the war they went to 12 volt & the post war French built jeeps eventually became 24 volt which is what mine is! 8)
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Re: cordless drill batteries

Postby HughSpencer » Sun Feb 27, 2011 10:22 pm

As an IT manager I get to replace UPS batteries every few years. Quite often the 7A 12v lead acid jell batteries still have a reasonable amount of life in them. As I have several cheap 9.4v cordless drills, I just solder a flex to the drill contacts and attach one of the above. It will run for quite some time and as there is a boxful of these things in the average UPS, it is easy to keep enough charged batteries to hand. BTW 12v isn't going to hurt a 9.4v motor as long as you aren't trying to drill 1.5" holes through oak beams.
Cheap 9.4v units can be recharged by plugging the charge unit into your car cigarette lighter socket - the mains charger is a 12v transformer.
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Re: cordless drill batteries

Postby Billman » Sun Feb 27, 2011 10:31 pm

Mark Allery wrote:Sorry Billman. The first landrovers, the 80inch, now known as series one were produced in 1948. The 1948 wiring diagram (series 1 user manual) clearly shows a 12 volt battery, positive earth. The first diesel engine was produced in 1957 but not available until 1958 so it just caught the end of series one and was certainly 12 volts though you rarely (even for a series one) see a diesel series one unless its a conversion. You may have seen two 6 volt batteries in series, as I believe this was not an uncommon practice when 6volt batteries were widely available. The VW beetle was originally 6volt for example.


2 x 6 volt batteries in series gives 12 volts (2 x 6 volts in parallel gives 6 volts but twice the amphours) - so I am agreeing with you......
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Re: cordless drill batteries

Postby jrccaim » Mon Feb 28, 2011 4:10 am

I am really impressed by the number of posts in this thread. Not bad for a bunch of power tool haters :). I just looked at the dead battery on my 12V Makita. Several things stand out: (1) + and - are clearly marked on this battery (2) The markings agree with my multitester (3) there is only one way to put the battery in -- it has a registering groove and ridge on it (4) after 2 years unused *and it is d e a d for sure) the thing still registers 10V! Now, were I to solder some wires on to this battery and connect these wires to a car battery, I would be in business. I might have to chisel or mill grooves for the wires. This lashup has the advantage of balancing the drill, which is nice. It is balanced properly with the extra battery weight in it. Second, should a suitable battery come your way, why you haven't messed the internals up. Well, I'll try this and report upon it. To do it according to Hoyle, you should use black wire for the - and red for +. But Mr Hoyle may get a raw deal; I'll use what I have.

Speaking of Nicads, reason I have that old battery is because I am not sure that the local garbage transfer station will handle it properly. In Anchorage (and Juneau) , the trash disposal people give you free a bright yellow bag for battery disposal. They make sure it does not get into the ground. I have no idea what you do with dead batteries in the UK, but it would certainly pay (environmentally speaking) to check. Same applies to these low-wattage mercury bulbs -- they have a gram of mercury apiece. Poison.
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Re: cordless drill batteries

Postby Paul Thornton 2sheds » Mon Feb 28, 2011 11:56 am

jrccaim wrote: Same applies to these low-wattage mercury bulbs -- they have a gram of mercury apiece. Poison.


yes, i think they are known as compact fluorecent bulbs or energy saving bulbs, but whilst reading the literature that came with my last bulb purchase (ie: in event of breakage ventilate room for 15 mins before clean up, do this and do that because of the mercury content) i was ratehr suprised.

our idea of what is environmentally friendly seems a little skewed perhaps? energy saving at the electic meter maybe, but what is thier carbon footprint? and what harm is done to the planet during thier manufacture and disposal compared with standard incandescent bulbs?

(way off greenwoodworking now eh?)

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Re: cordless drill batteries

Postby Billman » Mon Feb 28, 2011 11:32 pm

jrccaim wrote:I am really impressed by the number of posts in this thread. Not bad for a bunch of power tool haters :).


I was also surpised to see this topic, but couldn't resist joining in - having built an oak frame for an extension to the roof of my house, I didn' fancy chopping out the 30+ mortice and tenon joints by hand, so used a drill to get rid of 80% of the wood out of the 6"x 2"x 3" deep mortices - so I do not consider myself a purist anyway... but I still use a brace and bit for some jobs...
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Re: cordless drill batteries

Postby Robin Fawcett » Tue Mar 01, 2011 9:51 am

Come on guys - hasn't this thread gone on for long enough?
What's wrong with a brace and bit or auger? You get some good exercise and the only recharging needed is a cup of tea, a sandwich and a slice of cake!
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Re: cordless drill batteries

Postby jrccaim » Wed Mar 02, 2011 4:35 am

Robin Fawcett wrote:What's wrong with a brace and bit or auger? You get some good exercise and the only recharging needed is a cup of tea, a sandwich and a slice of cake!


I too think this thread is a bit long-running. But I couldn't resist that one. OK, with a brace and bit you can go up to 25mm. More than that and Superman himself would sweat up a storm. I speak from personal and extensive experience. I built myself a workbench with 25mm mortises, brace and bit all the way. It took several days to do, just couldn't turn the brace any more. Unfortunately I am a lot older than Superman seems to be. With an auger you can go maybe 37mm (1 1/4") or, if you are in good shape, you might be able to do 50mm or so. In frame construction for a house the standard mortise is 50mm. So what now? You have maybe 100-1000 such holes to drill :(

Well, you could find an antique boring machine. We've discussed that in another thread. Or you could buy a chain mortiser, $850 a pop, same thread. Gives me pause, it does. So one way to do it is to drill many holes with a small (6mm) bit. Well, you could do it by hand. But a cordless might save the day.

When I build furniture of any kind -- chairs, whatever -- I go brace and bit. I drive half my screws with my braces. In fact I own four of them; all secondhand, saves changing bits all the time. But I am looking at my woodshed project, and I see four mortises per bent, four bents. That's 16 mortises. Then we have the plate mortises, that's another 8. So I have 24 mortises. Oh, no! I need something like 4 holes per mortise. So I am close to one hundred holes. And I am not getting paid for one single hole! And I would really, really like to finish this before next winter, because my lashup woodshed will collapse any day now. (Literally -- I lashed it together).

I have a double standard, in a way. When I do "construction projects" I am trying to get the bl^&%y thing out of the way so that I can get back to the fun stuff, like shaving on the horse. For that, all means are legitimate, even power tools. When I do the real bodger work, why no thank you to power tools. So to net it out: power tools have a place. Even in bodger-land. That is why I've posted so much to this thread; it may provide someone with a few spare hours to get on the horse and shave, or turn something out on a pole lathe. And save fifty quid (for a new batt) or so into the bargain. :)
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Re: cordless drill batteries

Postby SeanHellman » Wed Mar 02, 2011 11:08 pm

jrccaim wrote:OK, with a brace and bit you can go up to 25mm. More than that and Superman himself would sweat up a storm.


I only buy braces with a ratchet on, this way I can push the brace handle a 1/3 tun and ratchet back and do another 1/3 turn on so on. This saves me a lot of arm ache. On bigger augers, especially the modern hex shank ones, why not use a socket ratchet to turn the bit? I remember reading on this forum someone doing just that. With large diameter holes I use a T bar auger.
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Re: cordless drill batteries

Postby Mike Abbott » Mon May 02, 2011 9:21 pm

I see it is 2 months since the last post on this thread. sorry for not joining in for a while. I have just ordered 6 new Nicad batteries rather than buy new Li ion ones for the same price cos i already have the 3 old Nicad drills and I'd rather not spend money on new drills. Just bought a solar panel and 2 deep cycle batteries to charge them. I hope we get a chance to talk about this in person at the w/e, cos it's all gobbledygook to me.
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Re: cordless drill batteries

Postby monkeeboy » Mon Feb 18, 2013 7:13 pm

I see it is 22 months since the last post on this thread...

I have an 18v cordless.

Has anyone successfully joined three 6v batteries to power an 18v drill?

My dead batteries are 18v 3.0Ah Mi-MH

Can anyone tell me how I work out exactly what kind of 6v batteries I need?
Is deep cycle the right type to use?
How do I know if a battery is really "heavy duty" apart from it being called so.

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Re: cordless drill batteries

Postby JonnyP » Mon Feb 18, 2013 9:14 pm

monkeeboy wrote:I see it is 22 months since the last post on this thread...

I have an 18v cordless.

Has anyone successfully joined three 6v batteries to power an 18v drill?

My dead batteries are 18v 3.0Ah Mi-MH

Can anyone tell me how I work out exactly what kind of 6v batteries I need?
Is deep cycle the right type to use?
How do I know if a battery is really "heavy duty" apart from it being called so.

Ta

I would think that 3.0ah would be heavy duty.

I have managed to revive some of my old drill batterys using car batterys
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Re: cordless drill batteries

Postby jrccaim » Tue Feb 19, 2013 5:14 am

Sheesh. In principle you can connect three six-volt batteries in series (that's + to - to + to - to - ) and you will have 18 volts. You could even connect one 12V and one 6 V batteries in series and get 18 v. Or three 6V batteries. Anything that adds up to 18 volts. Whether this is worth it is up to you. One must face it. The cordless drill may be wonderful (in fact I think it is, if only for its screw-driving settings) but eventually the battery will die. Second law of thermodynamics. Now I am just as big a cheapskate as anyone on this forum. But there will come a time when you just have to consider replacing the **** thing. A battery costs almost as much as the drill. This is because batteries are really high-tech stuff. The drills themselves are electric motors that can be turned out by automatic machinery in nothing flat. The battery is the major economic factor. It is the major cost factor in a cordless drill.

There are work-arounds. If you have a battery charger you can run a 12V drill (or ffor that matter a saw) off it.
But you are running your charger off mains, aren't you, now? So you might as well buy a mains-powered drill! in the first place. First law of Thermodynamics. What car batteries have over the stuff they sell you with the drill is capacity. Ampere-hours. Longevity.

I have been quoting Thermodynamic laws here and I hesitated before I wrote this, but I will simplify Thermodymanics for you. There are three laws:

(1) You can't win.
(2) You can't break even.
(3) You can't get out of the game.

The main factor in cordless drills (other tools as well; I own an 18V chainsaw) is convenience. You don't have to lug an extension cord around. For that matter there are few mains outlets in the woods. I have yet to find one :) You pay for this, laws (1) and (2). Eventually you will have to replace the battery. The drill itself looks like,and in fact is, a complicated piece of machinery. But it is turned out by robots. Cheapo. The battery is in fact the major cost item in a drill. It takes about 50 times as much energy to make a battery than you will ever get out of it. This is law (2).

This is a rant. I apologize. But it is well that we consider where we are. When someone tells me that cordless driills are "enviro-friendly" I get ill. They are not. In fact they are extremely wasteful. 50 to one is not a very good energy efficiency. So use your cordless drill. I do too. But remember, do not decieve yourself. You are saving no energy.
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Re: cordless drill batteries

Postby gavin » Tue Feb 19, 2013 8:43 am

jrccaim wrote: When someone tells me that cordless driills are "enviro-friendly" I get ill. They are not. In fact they are extremely wasteful. 50 to one is not a very good energy efficiency. So use your cordless drill. I do too. But remember, do not decieve yourself. You are saving no energy.

Some folk use cordless drills to cut tenons - Mike Abbott has popularised this in his Going with the Grain.
I used to do that, but now I prefer to cut my tenons metabolically using a hand-drill mounted horizontally.
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Re: cordless drill batteries

Postby monkeeboy » Tue Feb 19, 2013 7:44 pm

I'm not trying to save the planet by wiring my cordless drill to a car battery.
I'm just trying to use a good tool that cost me well over £100 and the batteries are the only thing that are stopping it from working!

I will mainly need it for on-site screw driving en masse.
I use braces and augers mainly for hole drilling.

If I am to wire 3 6v batteries in series, should I be trying to buy the batteries with the highest Ah value possible?
Or do I need to match the Ah to the batteries that came with the drill, which are 3.0 Ah?
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