Interesting splitting axe

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Interesting splitting axe

Postby toscano » Sat Jun 08, 2013 2:14 pm

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Re: Interesting splitting axe

Postby magnet » Sat Jun 08, 2013 8:32 pm

Some tool that. Thanks for posting..........Magnet :D
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Re: Interesting splitting axe

Postby Darrell » Sat Jun 08, 2013 8:57 pm

That is an interesting axe head design. But I'm not so sure about the results shown in the video.

Last winter we took down a large standing dead ash tree, about 18 inches diameter at the base. We split a bunch of it at that time, when it was frozen (-10 C) and it split easily. When we returned in the spring and tried to split more of it, to fuel the maple syrup boiler, we had a devil of a time. Once the wood thawed out it became very tough to split. Had to switch from a small axe to a sledge & steel wedges.

The video of this new axe appeared to be splitting frozen wood. Which can can be far easier than non-frozen in some cases.

Darrell
who taught a couple of lads how to carve spoons at last week's Scout camp.
Two more potential spoon carvers out there now...
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Re: Interesting splitting axe

Postby ToneWood » Sat Jun 08, 2013 9:43 pm

Ash does split remarkably well when fresh - haven't tried splitting old ash. I was quite surprised when my father-in-law point this out to me after we processed a large ash tree some years ago, as I'd planned to leave it a few months or a year. As a teenager, I used to split large rounds for firewood/exercise - I'm not sure what they were but probably elm as this was around the time that the village elms were felled due to Dutch elm disease (might have also had some oak and/or beech in the mix). I was able to split much of it but not all and it was hard work:I have recently learnt that elm is prized for it tendency not to split (e.g. Ben Orford uses it for his knife handles)! In that case, I found leaving the big rounds outside in the sun & rain for a year or two caused them to dry out and start to chequer/split of their own accord - they were then easy to split. The opposite to ash! It's handy that different woods have these different properties.
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Re: Interesting splitting axe

Postby Billman » Tue Jun 11, 2013 10:47 pm

I'be been using my american wedge type axe for chopping wood like this for years - it works perfectly well on sycamore, beech, ash, alder and oak - cutting with the growth rings is an easy way of splitting firewood from a large log that is too big to split across its diameter - good for lengths up to about 500mm....

There are several rhymes for firewoods (I've found dry elm burns OK):

Beechwood fires are bright and clear
If the logs are kept a year.
Chestnut's only good, they say,
If for long 'tis laid away.
But Ash new or Ash old
Is fit for a queen with crown of gold.
Birch and fir logs burn too fast
Blaze up bright and do not last.
It is by the Irish said
Hawthorn bakes the sweetest bread.
Elm wood burns like churchyard mould,
E ' en the very flames are cold.
But Ash green or Ash brown
Is fit for a queen with golden crown.
Poplar gives a bitter smoke,
Fills your eyes and makes you choke.
Apple wood will scent your room
With an incense like perfume.
Oaken logs, if dry and old.
Keep away the winter's cold.
But Ash wet or Ash dry
A king shall warm his slippers by.


Oaken logs, if dry and old,
Keep away the winter's cold
Poplar gives a bitter smoke,
Fills your eyes, and makes you choke
Elm wood burns like churchyard mould,
E'en the very flames are cold
Hawthorn bakes the sweetest bread -
Or so it is in Ireland said,
Applewood will scent the room,
Pearwood smells like flowers in bloom,
But Ashwood wet and Ashwood dry,
A King can warm his slippers by.


Beechwood logs burn bright and clear,
If the wood is kept a year
Store your Beech for Christmas-tide,
With new-cut holly laid aside
Chestnut's only good, they say
If for years it's stored away
Birch and Fir wood burn too fast,
Blaze too bright, and do not last
Flames from larch will shoot up high,
And dangerously the sparks will fly...
But Ashwood green,
And Ashwood brown
Are fit for Queen with golden crown.
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Re: Interesting splitting axe

Postby Heikki Kärnä » Mon Jan 06, 2014 8:09 pm

Hello
I would like to introduce myself as the inventor of the Vipukirves/Leveraxe.
The first time in the human history a tool that uses leverage in purpose to split fire wood is available for anybody interested.
This tool uses leverage that multiplies the splitting force many times bigger than in the conventional axes and mauls. The friction is practically non existent. That is why the axe blade will not get stuck to the block. You can split on the ground, on the rock, where ever the block happens to be, because the blade always stops on the top of the block or slows down the speed so that it is fully under the control of the user. There will not be such chocks to your wrists and body as with the conventional axes and mauls, because the splitting technique is different. Hold the handle as gently as possible to allow the rotation. Do not squeeze the handle. During the whole existent, over eight years there has happened NO ACCIDENT.
It took a long time till this invention saw the day light. That is why I will be delighted to answer to any relevant questions concerning this innovation.
This tool looks simple, but if you do not understand certain physical laws, then I can explain them to you. I am not willing to argue with anybody either, but I will honesty answer to made questions.
I will add some links where you can see the difference comparing the conventional way (wedge).
Best regards
Heikki, the inventor
http://youtubedoubler.com/?video1=http% ... meahwahwah

http://videodoubler.com/combo/40344

http://youtubedoubler.com/?video1=http% ... meahwahwah

http://youtubedoubler.com/?video1=KCJAD ... O%27Nymous

http://youtubedoubler.com/?video1=http% ... O%27Nymous

http://www.youtube.com/results?search_q ... rves&sm=12
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Re: Interesting splitting axe

Postby ToneWood » Tue Jan 07, 2014 9:05 pm

Clever tool Heikki - similar principle to the popular "wood grenade" splitting wedge and some modern wedge designs, such as Husqvarna's that have a twist?
ImageImage
But much faster. While it would be easy to rig a comparison (such as that shown on above yourtubedoubler link), I see no reason to doubt that your design works well - it is a good idea :)

[For greenwood workers, the disadvantage of the "wood grenade" is that - unlike a tradition flat splitting wedge - it cannot be used to precisely split, say, a large round into two bowl blanks; the Husqvarna wedge probably could though.]
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Re: Interesting splitting axe

Postby Billman » Wed Jan 08, 2014 11:07 am

Recently spent a couple of days in the woods at my step-son's house in France (he bought three felled tress from the commune) - not sure what the wood was (hardwood similar to beech, but easier to split - possibly hornbeam??) - trunks about 12 to 18 inches diameter. Cut into 16" (400mm) lengths, we split these with his grand-dad's old Nash 7lb felling axe. I had to use a wedge and sledge a couple of times on some particularly knotty bits, but otherwise the wood split fine with the narrow taper of a felling axe...

Just tried using my own splitting maul at home on some fresh felled sycamore and fir - I reverted to my old 4lb felling axe as it split better and required less effort...

Ther Finnish axe may well be a good buy of you have not altready got a decent axe, and I do like the way it has been designed - but I'd like to try it on some English oak or ash before I passed comment...
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Re: Interesting splitting axe

Postby Billman » Wed Jan 08, 2014 11:16 am

Just watched the first of Heikki's videos - the difference in technique is as much a part of the solution as the tool being used (see my comments above, in my earlier post about the difference between splitting a log radially through its centre, of tangentially from the edge) - my 4lb axe would have the same problems cutting radially, but work well cutting tangentially ( I have split 24" diameter sycamore and black poplar this way)...

I do like his method of using an old tyre to keep the log on the block as it is being split...
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Re: Interesting splitting axe

Postby goldsmithexile2013 » Wed Jan 08, 2014 1:13 pm

Billman wrote:Ther Finnish axe may well be a good buy of you have not altready got a decent axe, and I do like the way it has been designed - but I'd like to try it on some English oak or ash before I passed comment...


Thats exactly what I thought. Theres nothing new under the sun. In the videos it looks like perfect straight birch....same with the hakke pillke processors, they demonstarate using the best clean logs. I'd like to see it split some old crotchy oak too...otherwise I'll stick with my regular huskie splitting axe, which is designed to be used to safely drive wedges on the hammer side shoukd the need arise....more versatile.
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Re: Interesting splitting axe

Postby AlexanderTheLate » Wed Jan 08, 2014 4:11 pm

I've got to give you credit for being clever. But what do you do if you get the 'axe' stuck?
I fear the day that technology will surpass our human interaction. The world will have a generation of idiots.- Unknown.
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Re: Interesting splitting axe

Postby Heikki Kärnä » Wed Jan 08, 2014 6:56 pm

AlexanderTheLate wrote:I've got to give you credit for being clever. But what do you do if you get the 'axe' stuck?


Will not.
It's always easier to understand something if you know the whole procedure.
Nearly every one of us have made firewood with the conventional axe or maul (wedge). Development go's forward also in this sector, slowly it's true, but surely.
Friction is the biggest resistance when splitting fire wood. There has been endless attempts to get rid of it, but it is still there as a nasty nuisance.
Vipukirves / Leveraxe uses different technique. Because of the eccentric form the blade starts to lean to the right at the very moment, when the edge of the blade touches the surface of the block. The blade does not penetrate into the block as the conventional axes. On an optimum strike it penetrates only 5 millimetres, less than a quarter of an inch. So the distance into the block is so short that there is practically no friction at all. The leverage does the splitting. The edge of the blade grabs to the side of the piece of wood. The leverage multiplies the splitting force many times bigger. The kinetic energy turns to the left and pushes part of the block away. The leverage spreads the block up to eight centimetres, three and a half inch.
The blade stops on the top of the block, or slows down the speed so, that it is fully under the control of the user.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9jDR_2Zsr40

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E9_9wmjK3j8

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0WidHgSXx98
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Re: Interesting splitting axe

Postby AlexanderTheLate » Wed Jan 08, 2014 7:06 pm

Fair enough, but can this axe split wood into large pieces? Can it split knotted wood? :)
I fear the day that technology will surpass our human interaction. The world will have a generation of idiots.- Unknown.
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Re: Interesting splitting axe

Postby Heikki Kärnä » Wed Jan 08, 2014 7:12 pm

goldsmithexile2013 wrote:
Billman wrote:Ther Finnish axe may well be a good buy of you have not altready got a decent axe, and I do like the way it has been designed - but I'd like to try it on some English oak or ash before I passed comment...


Thats exactly what I thought. Theres nothing new under the sun. In the videos it looks like perfect straight birch....same with the hakke pillke processors, they demonstarate using the best clean logs. I'd like to see it split some old crotchy oak too...otherwise I'll stick with my regular huskie splitting axe, which is designed to be used to safely drive wedges on the hammer side shoukd the need arise....more versatile.


Letter from a customer.
-- Alkuperäinen viesti ---
Aihe: Vipukirves Christmas Present
Päiväys: 31.12.2008 14:17
Lähettäjä: Gary X [garyx@me.com]
Kopio: Gary X [garyx@me.com]

Dear Sir:

I saw videos showing your axe in operation on the Internet. I was so
impressed by the videos that I hinted to my family to get me one for
Christmas. My daughter, Kelly X, of St. Joseph, Illinois, USA,
did purchase the axe for me.

I was THRILLED to open the box on Christmas morning. The quality,
appearance, and construction of the tool was just what I had hoped it
would be. I was also impressed that my daughter would have gone to
the expense to have purchased the item and paid for the shipping to
get it here. Obviously, it is something of an extravagance, but I do
enjoy dealing with firewood. At my age (63) I guess the axe could be
thought of as an investment as a piece of "exercise equipment" as I do
think there is a health benefit from doing all the tasks related to
getting wood cut, moved, split, burned, and so on.

I was a little worried as to whether the axe would perform in a way
that would justify the cost. I had read a semi-scientific evaluation
of the axe at this internet location:
http://www.arboristsite.com/showthread. ... 925&page=8
The article is not entirely favorable to the Vipukirves and says
that the axe would have problems with the hard varieties of wood we
have in this part of the world. I was particularly concerned as I
split a great deal of Red Oak. I read this article AFTER I had hinted
to my family that I would like this axe for a gift.

So, when I went out to split about 15 rounds of recently cut red oak,
averaging around 25 to 30 inches in diameter and about 16 inches in
length (basically trunk wood) I wondered how the axe would work. I
hoped that I would not have added an extremely expensive, but little
used tool to my garage.

The axe performed beyond my expectations!! I could not have been more
wrong in doubting whether this tool would work for me. With my family
watching through the dining room window, I blasted through a sizeable
stack of red oak in short order!! They were impressed with the amount
of power the old guy (me) could generate and were genuinely impressed
with the tangled knot wood i was splitting.

As I had watched a lot of video of the axe in action, I felt I knew a
little about the technique to be used. It did not take long for me to
feel as though I was using the axe in the intended manner. I produced
decent sized spits (for my woodstove) and did so very quickly. I used
a chopping block with a tire as you show in your videos. I would say
I can swing an axe with considerable force (I can hit a golf ball over
300 yards) so I may not be a typical user. However, I did split
through knots in the red oak. I was extremely impressed with the
amount of splitting force being brought to bear on the knots I was
going through. Again, I was quite impressed and produced much better
results than I thought I would get after having read the Arborsite
article.

As with any man powered device used in attacking a tough round of oak,
judgement must be used. There are techniques learned over the years
in splitting wood and those must be applied with the Vipukirves, too,
or you will waste a lot of energy. Techniques and knowledge of how
splitting wood works (at least with a non hydraulic man powered
device) are essential.

But, if you do know a thing or two about splitting wood, this
Vipukirves is a fabulous tool. No matter what the cost, if you like
making firewood, and you consider it a fun and challenging activity,
this is the best item you can buy.


I BELIEVE YOU HAVE A WONDERFUL PRODUCT AND I LOOK
FORWARD TO USING IT FOR YEARS TO COME.

Sincerely,

Gary X

(axe was purchased by my daughter, Kelly X)
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Re: Interesting splitting axe

Postby Heikki Kärnä » Wed Jan 08, 2014 11:07 pm

AlexanderTheLate wrote:Fair enough, but can this axe split wood into large pieces? Can it split knotted wood? :)


Can do. No problems.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7XIZKNBnnNM

Knotty trees. Click "next" one after an other.
http://vipukirves.fi/media/video6.htm

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9iLwIKMRA8M

https://www.facebook.com/pages/VIPUKIRV ... 40?fref=ts
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