Easter Carvings

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Easter Carvings

Postby Vicky » Sun Apr 15, 2012 5:55 pm

I've been carving over Easter - haven't done any for a long time. No one at home is interested anymore (just more spoons to them) so decided to be very brave and try to put a photo on here.
I'm getting better - just carving now, not sanding! Much quicker now as well.
However I'm still struggling to upload photos that are a good size - will get the hang of it eventually.

spoons back 2.jpg
spoons back 2.jpg (148.93 KiB) Viewed 6935 times

spoons 7.jpg
spoons 7.jpg (126.55 KiB) Viewed 6935 times

spoons 5.jpg
spoons 5.jpg (160.67 KiB) Viewed 6935 times

spoons 4.jpg
spoons 4.jpg (191.67 KiB) Viewed 6935 times
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Re: Easter Carvings

Postby JonnyP » Sun Apr 15, 2012 6:45 pm

Very nice spoonses :0)
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Re: Easter Carvings

Postby chainsawkid » Sun Apr 15, 2012 8:05 pm

WOW :shock: Lovely work there, nice variation of styles too. Keep it up :D

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Re: Easter Carvings

Postby SeanHellman » Sun Apr 15, 2012 9:24 pm

Absolutely lovely, great forms and beautifully finished.
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Re: Easter Carvings

Postby jarrod stonedahl » Mon Apr 16, 2012 12:55 am

very nice, i like the detail in the handles
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Re: Easter Carvings

Postby Richard Irvine » Mon Apr 16, 2012 6:15 pm

Really great Vicky.
cheers
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Re: Easter Carvings

Postby Baggy » Mon Apr 16, 2012 7:47 pm

Nice work, I like the detailing.
Best wishes
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Re: Easter Carvings

Postby Vicky » Mon Apr 16, 2012 11:12 pm

Thanks guys - I shall carry on with my spoon carving therapy then :wink:
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Re: Easter Carvings

Postby ToneWood » Tue Apr 17, 2012 9:33 pm

Nice spoons Vicky! Good consistency, some classic designs and some daringly carved original ones too -- I've avoided carving into the lower end of the stem so far, that strikes me as quite daring, did you "loose" any?! I see you are in S. Devon - are you involved in a craft business down there? I noticed several craft centres in the area. We often holiday near Totnes (great fishing, beaches, lovely scenery, Dartmoor) although perhaps not this year TBD.
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Re: Easter Carvings

Postby Vicky » Tue Apr 17, 2012 11:08 pm

Hi,
No I haven't 'lost' a spoon for a long time now. My most common mistake is the bowl gets a bit thin so thats what I have to watch for (I get carried away with the spoon knife and some spoons were translucent! Recent ones in the picture all OK) I'm trying to see how thin handles can be as my Dad said that the swedish style ones that I was carving for a while were too chunky !
I live in Kingsbridge near Totnes. Don't sell any spoons at the moment - I just put them in a basket or give them away, I am thinking about selling them now that I'm quicker at carving, it would be nice to have a hobby that at least pays for itself. I asked about sitting and carving at the town Farmers Markets on a holiday weekend just to see what the reaction is - they, the powers that be, are deciding if I'm allowed at the moment (the cogs grind slowly here in Devon) although I'm a bit worried that I'll just be inundated by all the kids that I work with in town and none of the posh visitors will want to have a look. :roll: I have a friend that sells her local wool, from her designer sheep, and expensive knitted clothing, so wouldn't be too out of place there.
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Re: Easter Carvings

Postby ToneWood » Wed Apr 18, 2012 1:45 pm

:D Yes, self-sustaining hobbies are something I aim for too - a modest ambition but quite hard to achieve. I usually have to settle for self-subsidizing (like my fishing).
I know Kingsbridge, a few of us got together and rented an old forge down there a few years ago, at South Pool I think. V. pleasant area. There were shoals of large grey mullet swimming
along the shore next to the main carpark in Kingsbridge while we were there :).

Scraping the bowl thin is something I've run into too - especially on the side of the bowl, particularly the right-hand side. I'm wondering if a gouge might work better than a spoon knife (heresy?!). I came across a thread were a spoon maker mentioned in passing that he preferred to use a gouge and the other person said he did too! I've seen a picture of Wille Sundqvist carving out the bowl of a spoon with a gouge too - he held it oddly though, I think around the blade, closer to the cutting edge, with his hand braced of the edge of the spoon's bowl. One of his carving "grips" no doubt.

Yes, I was wondering if my Bass Ladle might be a bit thick and heavy, it seems fine to me but compared to say a wooden spatula from the store, it is rather large and heavy - I guess with wood it is possible to make things light but it was never a goal of mine but I am beginning to wonder if it is something that people look for and value. I don't think I went to Kingsbridge market but Totnes market is very hippy-ish and a crafts person working on the street would be "right up their street" I would think; they usually have a few street musicians working at any time. I like Totnes but how can a town that small support so many wholefood stores?! :D
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Re: Easter Carvings

Postby gavin » Thu Apr 19, 2012 7:12 pm

ToneWood wrote: Yes, self-sustaining hobbies are something I aim for too - a modest ambition but quite hard to achieve.

Actually, profitable greenwoodwork is far easier than you and many others imagine. But anyone seeking a profit must be willing to learn and study selling and marketing with at least half the vigour they put into studying making and tooling. For greater profit, study harder.

All readers of this BB are interested in discussion of converting tree to product. Far less have an interest in discussion of converting product to money. But if you really desire money, you must study that final conversion process of product into money. The most common reason people buy face-to-face is because they are asked. If you don't - or won't ask - you won't get. Accept that not all those you ask will buy. But do keep asking. Those that sell lots have lots of different ways of asking and they practise them. But if you have a price displayed and ask just 15 people in one hour at a fair or show: Do you want it? something will happen. You'll certainly learn. You'll nearly certainly sell to one or more.

The first item to discard is any self-doubt as to whether the item you just made is 'good enough' . Hell's teeth - shavings can be sold as hamster bedding or firestarting kits or bookmarks, so any vaguely hollow-form lump of wood can be sold as a bowl or spoon. Remember most customers are not buying utility, they are buying a souvenir of their day out.

But if you cannot dispel self-doubt (even for five minutes), you are - as they say here in Scotland - scunnered and not able to progress into making your hobby self-sustaining.
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Re: Easter Carvings

Postby ToneWood » Thu Apr 19, 2012 11:38 pm

Good information Gavin. This is obviously something you've put quite a lot of time and thought into.

In America, they sometimes suggest that you practice buying, selling and haggling at garage sales - the sums involved are usually small and, done right, it's usually a bit of fun for all concerned. In the UK the equivalent is car boot sales - which might be even better, because there is more going on in one place. I sold my first bowl at a tiny car boot sale nearby ( I doubt if more than 30 people people showed up all told - but I didn't have to travel far and it was opposite a pub :)). We just filled the car with old toys, books and odds and ends. I took my first bowl as we were trying to clear out clutter and nobody seemed to like my rather crude bowl (except me - I thought it was great :D), so I was taken by surprise when somebody ask "how much", so I didn't have any idea of what I might ask for it. I said a low number - in that annoying self-deprecating English way - and the chap just handed the cash over - the only person not to haggle all day, clearly the price was way too low (it would have worked out at pennies per hour given the amount of effort to make it but there was little danger that it would be mistaken for one of Jogge's or David's :D). But I was chuffed that somebody else like it enough to buy it, it encouraged me to continue and I learnt to be better prepared and to value my work a little more in the future - so it was a positive experience. (I would now happily pay twice what I received to buy that bowl back.)
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