Making a shave horse - questions

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Re: Making a shave horse - questions

Postby ToneWood » Sun Dec 16, 2012 10:16 am

:) Thanks Stibs, without your encouragement, and Gavin's, I wonder if I would ever have got started on the shave horse. Thank you both :) - & jrrcaim who made me believe I could & should known how to make mortice & tenon joints, and Sean Hellman for demonstrating what a mortice chisel is capable of & encouragement. I know that it is rougher than most others but it works well and I made it, incredible. The only power tool used, a cheap electric drill. Some of the advantages of green-wood construction techniques that occurred to me during construction: I can disassemble this quickly and simply with just a mallet and fabricate my own replacement parts to repair/refine/upgrade it.

Alas I am far too ugly and my lovely wife far too busy to take pictures with me in them but here is my horse with no name:
Shave horse - assembled, profile.jpg
Shave horse - assembled, profile.jpg (99.73 KiB) Viewed 4053 times

Shave horse - assembled, rear right side view.jpg
Shave horse - assembled, rear right side view.jpg (87.74 KiB) Viewed 4053 times

Shave horse - assembled, rear side view.jpg
Shave horse - assembled, rear side view.jpg (74.25 KiB) Viewed 4053 times

Now I can finally get back to sawing firewood. ;)
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Re: Making a shave horse - questions

Postby mstibs » Sun Dec 16, 2012 6:22 pm

ToneWood wrote:Now I can finally get back to sawing firewood.


Hope, you didn't have to freeze while making the horse ;) . Nice work. Especially the beech dumbhead looks impressive and biting.
Cheers!
STIBS
Saxons. Were good wood-turners, they had to be because they were poor potters...from "A Short History of Woodturning with the Pole-lathe" by Brian G. Howarth; My bilingual (de/en) Blog: http://mstibs.wordpress.com
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Re: Making a shave horse - questions

Postby ToneWood » Tue Dec 18, 2012 2:50 pm

Thanks Stibs. Not too cold -I wear lots of layers to start with and then seem generate my own heat when working. Yes the head is a bit big - about the size of a shoebox. I was keen to preserve mass as it was quite hard to find, haul & shape a piece of wood big enough for this. I left it a little bigger than the plan all around so that I could refine the shape later, as it was not perfectly "square". In the end I got the shape close enough to satisfy me and I didn't want to remove any more wood then.

I started out with the idea that the dumb-head had to be massive (i.e. heavy). However, I have since noticed that most dumb head shave horses have smaller heads than mine and some have very thin, light heads -- apparently great mass isn't required. I'll have to see how mine works out. The English-style shave horses seem to work fine yet don't have great mass, nor do they have the extra leverage provided by the raised pivot position of the dumb-head shave horse - something Drew Langsner describes at some length in his 1970s/80's book but which I now suspect is not that important (and could probably be applied to English-style horses too, simply by drilling the swing arm pivot through the adjustable inclined plank instead of the sit-plank - but perhaps that would interfere with size adjustments?).

I'll probably tweak the horse once I have used it more. Some ideas have already been mentioned above & on the main Shave Horse thread. Because I used Jogge's tried and tested plans and because I was constantly checking the fit of everything as the build progressed, I didn't have any size adjustments to make at the end. It just slotted together & worked. I did make a few deviations from the plan: the legs are a little taller and thicker (35mm diameter) than the plan's, the sit-plank is a foot/30cm shorter, the swing arm is curved (more like Drew Langsner's original 1980's design), my swing arm is only half the depth shown on the plan (& the mortice & tenon dimensions adjusted accordingly).

Small things to consider
Mainly "finish" type things:
- round the corners
- incut the sides of the sit plank for my legs (don't feel a need/benefit to this currently but I guess it would reduce size/weight a little)
- refine the head shape/weight

Medium things to consider
Mainly ergonomics:
- reduce the inclination of the inclined plane to 10-degrees [per Sean Hellman's advice] and/or make the angle and/or height adjustable. The angle could be reduced by lifting the front of the inclined plane with an addition piece of wood - per Sean Hellman's shave horse of P1 of this thread.
- maybe reduce the width of the inclined plank, if it turns out to be an obstruction (but perhaps it will be useful?).

Bigger things:
Mainly replacement of parts:
- smart-head
- replace sit-plank & inclined plane & maybe slim legs (from 35mm to 30mm diameter ?).
- holes & wooden "bench dogs" in the inclined plane (and perhaps the sit-plank and/or dumb-head) to aid working with bowls
Last edited by ToneWood on Wed Feb 06, 2013 2:43 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Making a shave horse - questions

Postby mstibs » Tue Dec 18, 2012 9:53 pm

I have a single question I ask myself when I made a new tool for me:
Can I be productive with the device I built in the desired product quality?
Two answers possible:
Nope: Firewood, time for a fresh start.
Yeah: Great, I leave it mostly like it is and make something on it until I have the time and need to build a better one.

:D
Cheers!
STIBS
Saxons. Were good wood-turners, they had to be because they were poor potters...from "A Short History of Woodturning with the Pole-lathe" by Brian G. Howarth; My bilingual (de/en) Blog: http://mstibs.wordpress.com
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