new members why not sign up and introduce yourself here :D

When you are starting out there are a lot of questions. Ask them here!

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Postby Tom B » Wed Jun 04, 2008 10:38 pm

Thanks for that!
It was stumbling across your website about a year ago that first inspired me to give spooncarving a go.

Somewhere in the shed at home is a pole lathe my dad built a while back. I'll have to dig it out when I have the time!

Tom
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Postby robin wood » Thu Jun 05, 2008 7:27 am

Tom B wrote:Somewhere in the shed at home is a pole lathe my dad built a while back. I'll have to dig it out when I have the time!

Tom


I hear that a lot, its one of the reasons we teach spooncarving, I reckon over 50% of all the people we have ever taught still carve regularly. It is just so much more accessible than the lathe, you can pick it up and put it down, no need for the dedicated workspace, simple requirements for raw materials. I am on a mission to get the UK greenwoodworking scene into spooncarving, it just makes sense no wonder it is the most common greenwood craft in Scandinavia..
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Re: new members why not sign up and introduce yourself here

Postby Andrea L Willett » Thu Jun 05, 2008 7:46 am

robin wood wrote:Welcome guests.

We know you are out there, lots of folk looking at the forum but not signing up and posting.
Just a thought; some of those "guests" might actually be members. I leave this forum up on my computer while I'm doing other things. It automatically signs you off after a period of inactivity. I'll refresh the screen to see if anything new's been posted but I won't sign back on unless there's something I want to reply to. While I'm signed off I'm listed as a "guest".

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Another newby

Postby davestovell » Thu Jun 05, 2008 11:42 pm

Hi I thought I would introduce myself.

I am a product designer based in Essex and have been following the forum for a few months. I am very interested in using some of the older wiser crafts in my work which until now has tended to use waste materials or virgin materials from who knows where.

I did a days basic green wood introduction with Robin Fawcett back in March and was blown away by greenwood as a material (and Robins enthusiasm), but I realise that most of my greenness is behind the ears.

Since then I have got some tools (Gransfors carving axe, Draw knife, Froe, some Ashley Illes chisels) various components for a pole lathe which I hope to be making next week and joined APT. Unfortunately I missed the ball as I was involved in an exhibition.

I am also very interested in exploring the provenance of a product and an example of this can be seen on Robins blog (15th May ) as my web site is in the process of being rebuilt and I am not sure how to upload images to here.

Hopefully I will have the pole lathe in use very soon and be able to share some of my efforts for criticism and advice,

Regards

David
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Re: Another newby

Postby robin wood » Fri Jun 06, 2008 7:54 am

davestovell wrote:Hi I thought I would introduce myself.
David


Hi David welcome aboard, hope you find some useful info here, and feel free to ask anything, I am sure there are lots of beginners out there reading so don't worry about asking newbie questions it would be good to have some questions and answers to the basics posted.

I remember reading about your work on Robins Blog...seems very topical as more folk are more interested in the providence of things.
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And another...

Postby Andy Coates » Fri Jun 06, 2008 10:22 pm

Hello all,

to quote Robin F on his recent intro to the AWGB forum...

Hello from a turner from the Dark Side...(non human-powered lathe!)

I do though, do some greenwood work...spoons thanks to Robin's book, and I do quite a few green oak commissions which seem to breed each other..."Oh that's lovely! Can I order one?"...

I've become more and more interested in green woodwork (but already do a lot of green work on the electric lathe), and have started to collect tools. I even made a froe today from a diagram in Drew something or other's book. And Rob Fawcett insists I should give in to myself and build a pole lathe.

Anyway, it's a great forum, lots of interest even for a devout electric lather like me. I only hope I can add a few things along the way.

Anyway...Hi!

Andy
Last edited by Andy Coates on Tue Sep 09, 2008 7:20 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby Bob_Fleet » Fri Jun 06, 2008 11:19 pm

Even some of us on the dark side use a pole lathe.
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http://www.onegoodturn.co.uk

Society is like a stew. If you don't keep it stirred up, you get a lot of scum on top.--Edward Abbey

Come and see us all at http://www.wooplaw.org.uk
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Postby robin wood » Sat Jun 07, 2008 8:32 am

Hi Andy,

and good to meet you in cyberspace. No problem with power turners here, great to have you contributing.

I often make the point to folk that power lathes use very little energy and that from a green/environmental point of view a power turner who stays in their workshop uses far less fossil fuel than a pole lathe turner who drives around the country doing demos. I think the two worlds have a lot to learn from each other, I am always keen to encourage amateur power turners to use green timber from local sources.

Andy has a great website
http://www.cobwebcrafts.co.uk/
and interesting blog
http://www.cobwebcrafts.co.uk/blog.htm

I forget how many hits you told me the blog gets Andy but I was very impressed.
Robin
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green wood...

Postby Andy Coates » Sat Jun 07, 2008 9:32 am

Hello,

and thanks for the welcome.

If I look at it sensibly, then close to 100% of the wood I use is green. I source all my wood (I don't use any exotics or imported wood at all) from within a ten mile radius. The vast majority is green, and I either rough out and dry, or season myself. So I guess it's all green wood essentially.

I also use a lot of reclaimed, interesting, wood. Old elm, oak, and chestnut beams from demolished properties Etc.

I also work without any heat source in the workshop, which is more a facet of parsimony, rather than a green concern, but amounts to the same thing! :D

Chris Eagles, the AWGB chairman, does a lot of green woodwork, and does a great demo using small logs, a froe and axe, and an electric lathe. The idea being that you don't really need a bandsaw for everything. With a sharp axe you can even chop out a bowl blank with relative ease.

Maybe we could develop fusion turning!
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Postby conny » Fri Jun 20, 2008 1:00 am

Hello everyone out there.
My name is Magnus and i am from sweden.
i found this forum a couple of months, ago and i did actually ask some questions, it was about making rake tines, i thank all of you who answered.
i actually made one of those plates and it works quite well. I like to make things that i can use, i make sycthe (wrong spelling?) handels,(dont know what u call them, in sweden we call them "orv") rakes, handles, and other things. Been practising with my poole lathe for a while too.


Thanks for a very nice forum

magnus
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Postby robin wood » Fri Jun 20, 2008 7:40 am

Hi Magnus,

Nice to have more Swedish input. many of us have a high regard for Swedish craftwork. Here we call the scythe handle a "snath" it is an odd word and I don't know if it is an old English word or if it comes from another language.

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Postby Groomporter » Mon Sep 08, 2008 11:24 pm

Greetings from Minneapolis.
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I'm the one who posted a little video of my hand-powered bow lathe on YouTube this past spring
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=14nf_AzM_kE
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Postby robin wood » Sat Sep 13, 2008 10:37 am

Nice lathe and good info on historic lathes on your site too. I particularly like the socket for the square drive. Have you seen square jam chucks on old lathes? I once saw a group of material from a Roman period Egyptian site which included split spindles with square ends and what I believed to be a mandrel with square jam chuck end.
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Postby Groomporter » Mon Sep 15, 2008 1:30 pm

No I hadn't seen an example of a square holed chuck, but I was finding I was having some slippage using a round jam chuck especially when roughing a piece it it wasn't quite round yet. And since I'm often working with thin objects like game pegs and lace bobbins I didn't want too much pressure from the tail stock so I figured it would be a reasonable compromise.

I have toyed with trying something like a collet that I believe is/was used by watchmaker' lathes, or maybe like this one that I found pictured in M. Darlow's Woodturning Methods.
Image

My next lathe I'ld like to do is a version of Da Vinci's -something like Stuart King has made, but I was thinking about a miniature version that I could sit at, I've got an old grinding stone from a family farm that I thought I might use for the fly wheel.
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Postby pdcawley » Wed Oct 01, 2008 7:02 am

Hello, I'm Piers. I just finished doing a spooncarving workshop with Robin, which has already seen me buying one of the Gransfors Bruks large carving axes and wishing the Helgess hook knives we used on the course were available.

I doubt I'll end up with the full Polelathe though - space, fitness and time constraints all conspire against that one.
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